Gothic

Gothic door openings often feature a pointed arch. The doors can be rustic or elaborate in their construction and are often made in heavier woods such as oak. In addition to residential projects, many of our Gothic-style doors are found in churches and universities, such as Princeton, Yale, University of Notre Dame, Vassar College, and the University of Pennsylvania. Some of these have replaced original doors in restored buildings. Our experience constructing Gothic-style doors has added critical authenticity to new buildings constructed in these earlier styles.

Offering solidity, strength and a sense of tradition, the Gothic style has been popular in North America since the mid-1800s for universities, churches and fine homes. Based on a more sophisticated version of plank-style doors, Gothic doors often feature what is known as “frame-and-plank” construction. Vertical planks are attached to a basic frame, which provides a stabilizing structure. In some cases, planks are fastened to both sides of the frame, effectively hiding the internal frame from view. Gothic-style doors are often arched and frequently pointed in their design.

Photography: Blank Creative

Photography: Blank Creative

Photography: Blank Creative

Photography: Blank Creative

Photography: Blank Creative

Church of the Incarnation, Highlands, NC

New Bethel Church, Kempton, PA | Photography: Blank Creative

Bryn Athyn College, Bryn Athyn, PA

Yale University, New Haven, CT

University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN

Princeton University, Princeton, NJ