Classical

A Classical entryway will delight the eye. It is often the most ornamented of entryways and serves as a frontispiece for the entire façade. We offer design and fabrication services to provide the best solutions for these important entryways. Using appropriate combinations of pilasters, pediments, and porticos, our classical entryways are custom-tailored for your project.

Classical doors encompass a wide range of design variations constructed with the frame-and-panel method. In the early 1700s, “frame-and-panel” doors replaced the plank-style doors used by the first American settlers. This new construction style, which is still used today, is more sophisticated and effective. It helped resolve the problem of seasonal expansion and contraction of wood. In frame-and-panel doors, two vertical stiles spanned the length of the door on each side, connected by horizontal rails. This frame was then completed with “floating panels” that fitted into grooves cut into the stiles and rails. The overall effect resulted in a door that minimized the tendency to swell and shrink, thus remaining more airtight.

Classical door styles and their primary period of use in North America include:

GEORGIAN (CA. 1700–1780) The first dominant architectural style in Colonial America based on designs developed by the royal architects of King George I, II and III.

FEDERAL (CA. 1790–1820)Post-revolutionary style that introduced more elaborate decoration and widespread use of the fanlight above the door.

CLASSICAL REVIVAL (CA. 1790–1825)Similar in design to Federal period doors, but constructed with the use of early woodworking machinery, which allowed for more variety in moldings.

GREEK REVIVAL (CA. 1825–1860)The first significant shift in style from the Federal period, often with larger vertical panels and more elaborate moldings.


Photography: Jason Sandy

Photography: Jason Sandy

Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton, NJ | Photography: Jeffery Totaro

Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton, NJ | Photography: Jeffery Totaro

Photography: Jeffery Totaro

Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton, NJ | Photography: Jeffery Totaro

Photography: Jason Sandy

Photography: Jason Sandy

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Touraine Apartments, Philadelphia, PA

Plaza Hotel, New York, NY