Historic Doors | Fine Craftsmanship in Woodworking

Gothic Doors

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This entry design was inspired by a childhood storybook for our client. The speakeasy and clavos add to its character.

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Yale University, Connecticut.

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The antique linen fold panels seen here were imported form England by our client. They were integrated into the above door for their Chesapeake Bay home.

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Fabricated from Spanish Cedar this entry was made to fit an existing store opening. It features raised panels on the door leaves as well as curved raised paneling in the extension jamb.

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This white oak entry can be found at Yale University in Connecticut. It was designed and fabricated using tongue and groove plank panels in a stile and rail construction. The following photograph shows the exterior of the same entry.

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These doors grace the entrance of College Hall at The University of Pennsylvania.

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The Brickman Center, Bryn Athyn College, Pennsylvania. Historic Doors was responsible for the design and fabrication of this entry and the rose window above.

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Private Residence, Millbrook, New York.

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Coleman Morse Center, University of Notre Dame, Indiana. Historic Doors engineered and fabricated this entry and with transom and quatrefoil above.

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Gothic

There is nothing better than a solid, heavy entry door on a Tudor or Gothic home. In addition to residential projects, many of our Gothic style doors are found in churches and universities, such as Princeton, Yale, University of Notre Dame, Vassar College and University of Pennsylvania. Some of these have replaced original doors in restored buildings. Our experience in constructing durable Gothic style doors has added critical authenticity to new buildings constructed in these earlier styles.

Historical Note

Offering solidity, strength and a sense of tradition, the Gothic style has been popular in North America since the mid-1800’s for universities, churches and fine homes. Based on a more sophisticated version of plank-style doors, Gothic doors often feature what is known as “frame-and-plank” construction. Vertical planks are attached to a basic frame, which provides the stabilizing structure. In some cases, planks are fastened to both sides of the frame, effectively hiding the internal frame from view. Gothic style doors are often arched and frequently pointed in their design.